When It Must Be Love …

Love bugs

~*~

When it must be love what does any equine with the name of Shakespeare do? Why, write a sonnet, of course …

Sonnet XXV

As in the dark of night a thief doth steal,

New love my heart hath seizéd in a trice.

And shouldst I share with you just how I feel:

Its thumpy-thumpy-thump is rather nice.

A feisty filly brightens this ol’ bay,

And so profoundly fills my soul with bliss

I scarce believe, this cold Feb’rary day,

A move from old to new hath brought me this.

*

I did not look for love; no, it found me.

And in my heart-home set most perfect peace.

Where once twas blind I now more clearly see

For ‘pon this life love’s joy hath wrought new lease.

And to my heart hath whispered pure and true

With lovely presence of my darling Zu.

~*~

If you’ve been following this blog for the past few weeks I suspect you knew this was bound to happen.

Believe me, my purpose with this blog is not to focus on Shakespeare’s (aka Bear’s) love life. Still, it’s part of his journey and I spend time with him every day, so how can it be ignored?

As I’ve noted before he is much happier in his work lately. There’s more spring in his step. Is it just the fresh guidance we’re receiving as we begin to learn the nuances of dressage, or does Bear’s (and my) happier heart also have something to do with it?

There’s more to life than work, of course. Love is what really makes the world go around, and love is what we celebrate on Valentine’s Day.

Frankly, I wish it was more than romantic love, and its lustful deviations, that were the focus of this day. This is a rather small and, on some levels, insignificant part of the story.

Hearts and flowers and dinners and whatever are all lovely, but the essence of love ~ the peace it brings to our hearts when it is true ~ is what I feel needs to be celebrated and promoted.

What does true love feel like?

A gift of roses from Shakespeare and I to you ... :-)

A gift of roses for you …

It can take years to understand that true love creates feelings of perfect peace. It allows us to always be ourselves. Doesn’t judge. Doesn’t ask us to modify our behaviour or body or destroy our spirit for any reason. Any changes that occur “in love” are a natural evolution of the expansion of our comfort zone while feeling loved and secure in the presence of another.

True love accepts about us even the things we find hard to accept about ourselves, because it sees beyond our weakness, insecurities and imperfections to our truth.

Being comfortable in our own skin, in love, is one of the surest signs I know that love is true.

Strange as it may be to say this about a horse, I believe this is true for Bear. Since basking in the winter sun with Zu he is the most relaxed I have ever seen him.

Am I a jealous mother?

No!

Zu Zu brings Bear a peaceful heart, and isn’t that what every mother wants for her child? 😉

It must be love.

Nurture what you love this day … and forever …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2014

Introducing Zu Zu …

Rather than bore you with yet another rant about how miffed I am about yet another dumping of snow interfering with my precious barn time, I thought I’d introduce you to Bear’s new girlfriend. Rather appropriate, don’t you think, with Valentine’s Day just around the corner.

A couple of days ago, when it was finally warm enough to pull out the good camera, I captured a few images of the happy couple out in the rolling paddock behind the barn.

Bear and Zu Zu

They were hanging out by the far fence line, so I called to Bear. He turned his head to acknowledged me and, naturally, when he did, she did.

Zu leads

After a few moments hesitation, where it looked as if it they were discussing whether or not it was worth their while to interrupt their mutual meditation Zu Zu, it seems to me, decided it would be appropriate to make the trek across the snow for a visit. Or, possibly, Bear indicated to her he wanted to see his mom and nudged her along. At any rate, you can see that he’s quite the gentleman allowing Zu to take the lead. Or did she, the alpha mare that she is, just take the lead and he followed? Hmmmm … this is open to debate.

Bear follows

Either way, they trudged happily together through the snow to the gate and, as any gentleman would, Bear stood back to allow his beauty to star in her very own picture.

Zu Zu

Zu Zu is a rising four-year-old mare of the Canadian breed.  She is much smaller than Bear, but what she lacks in stature she more than makes up in attitude. She is the boss and has wrapped herself around Bear’s heart.

And mine. 😉

Nurture what you love  …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy Chiotti, All Rights Reserved 2014

#FWF … The Heart is More Than Words

#FWF … The Heart is More Than Words.

via #FWF … The Heart is More Than Words.

Some thoughts on the horse I’ve shared on my blog “In So Many Words.” Seems appropriate to share these musings here also.

Please check it out …

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

 

The Gift

Winter hay

Perhaps I indulge the muse just little too much but, here again, a new inspiration from my darling Shakespeare ~ a poet out standing in his field.

I guess he knows something’s up … 😉

Enjoy!

~*~

Sonnet XXIII

‘Pon snowy mounds of white a glint of moon

As through the frigid night the light descends

And on the breeze a hint we’re moving soon;

A chapter new begins while this one ends.

The wind of winter change doth blow it seems

To lead us to a life that’s bright and new

So Mother dear can chase another dream

And I, perchance, can help that dream come true.

*

For what is life if not a chance to dream?

To seek our hearts desire and make it so.

A miracle that casts a vibrant beam

Into the hearts of those who dare to grow.

My gift to she who brightens up my day?

Is all my heart can give to light the way.

Shakespeare “The Equine”
December 2013

~*~

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2013

Why The Long Face? … More Musings from a Poet Out Standing in His Field

The Poet

Following 18 days grazing the pastoral beauty of rural England it’s time, once more, for me to step into the day-to-day and establish a routine, albeit a slightly adjusted one as I make more room for tea time. 😉

As for a certain horse ~ apparently my absence did not go unnoticed.

While I pull my vacation-stoked thoughts together in preparation for future writing projects, please enjoy the thoughtful ruminations (in sonnet form, of course) of my darling Shakespeare.

Oh, the drama …

~*~

Sonnet XXI

Woe Is Me

A fog of loneliness my spirit shroud

As separate from the one I love am forced.

My head and heart bemoan this passing cloud

No matter some might think me just a horse.

Thus plant my lips do I in grassy field

To fill the hours head down in happy place.

For to my sadness I resist to yield

And paste diminished smile on this long face.

*

As minutes pass to hours pass to days

In moments do I dwell my heart to heal.

Yet to the paddock gate I’m wont to gaze

In search of she to whom my heart reveal.

Perchance, as all things do, this fog will pass,

Returning to my view my lovely lass.

~*~

Fortunately there is a happy ending …

~*~

Sonnet XXII

Woe Be Gone!

The spearmint chill of autumn through my bones

Creeps as the frigid winds my flesh embrace.

Full care take I my heart turns not to stone

So mem’ries of my Love remain in place.

And to this end am glad to do my part

As from the gate a voice drifts o’er the breeze

To heat the very cellar of my heart

So flesh and bones thus warm a few degrees.

*

My Love, she hath returned. Oh bliss! Oh joy!

Cold wind her sweet voice carries home to me.

No more disconsolate or lonely boy

Love swarmeth in my heart as buzzing bee.

As bones and flesh alive with her now heal

The autumn’s chills no longer do I feel.

~*~

Bear Smiles

We’ll return to regular programming shortly .. 😉

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2013

Thrilled to be Freshly Pressed …

Life is what happens when you’re doing whatever.

That’s my variation on John Lennon’s immortal “Life is what happens when you’re making other plans.”

It was early Tuesday afternoon and I wasn’t planning anything, I guess, except to return home after a lovely few hours spent at the barn with Bear. As I parked myself in the driver’s seat of my car and checked my iPhone for emails before heading out, there it was … a message from Michelle at WordPress.

How appropriate. I was at the barn when I learned that my post Confessions of a Coaching Intern: Finding Clarity with a Pitchfork and a Song was going to be Freshly Pressed.

I am beyond thrilled by this tremendous honour.

My sincerest desire when writing for any of my blogs is that what pours from my heart by way of my writing will touch the hearts of those who stop by to read it.

Shakespeare and I have travelled a bumpy road over the past several years, but an illuminating and fulfilling one as well. It’s done my heart good to share our stories, and I will continue to do so as we continue our journey together.

My thanks to WordPress.com for the Freshly Pressed recognition, and to everyone who has in anyway supported my efforts here by reading, liking, commenting and following what goes on in my little equestrian world.

A kiss

To finish, a brief word about my closing line “Nurture what you love …”

On this journey called life, with the help of my beautiful horse, my husband and a good therapist, I have learned that it is not enough to say you love. The word is dead without deed; without nurturing.

Lots of people said they loved me, when I was a little girl, but life and family circumstances left me un-nurtured*; unable to see my Self and horribly traumatized. In fact, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder was my constant companion for most of my life without me realizing it.

A series of wake-up calls, including the one highlighted in my Freshly Pressed post noted above, started showing me there was a different way of being.

In fact, horses have been among my greatest teachers.

Horses demand that we be authentic, connected in self-awareness just as they are …and they call us on it when we are not. They walk on egg shells for no one and will keep offering up the same lessons to us until we figure it out. Often these lessons are not pretty. I know. I’ve been on the receiving end of many in my life as an equestrian.

Horses have taught me to address my anger, bitterness, disappointments, misery in my own time and not bring it to the barn. When I do this the barn becomes a place of nurturing, of healing. When I project a nurturing attitude toward Bear, he reflects it back to me. He is therapy for me only in as much as I am self-aware enough to receive the lessons he teaches.

Many horses (you can insert children, animals, people, etc. here as well) are abused by people who pay lip service to the word “love.”

To say we love is not enough. Love is just an empty, and abused, word without the actions to back it up.

So, nurture what you love … and that means you, too.

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

* Since I’m being so open with you, I will clarify here that I am aware that my mother, a single parent pursuing a career in show business at the time, did her best to provide the necessities of life and to make sure that my brother and I knew we were loved. However, exhausted from her operatic endeavours, and managing a home and family with no financial or emotional support of any kind from our dead-beat father, and thousands of miles away from any extended family who might have been able to pick up some slack, there was simply not enough nurturing energy available to her to fill the word love. This is where I fell through the cracks.

*

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2013

Escape With Me …

Yuk it up

… and pass the time with my equine entertainment coordinator … the comic, Shakespeare … as we engage in a little horse play.

You all know him as Bear, of course, but that doesn’t alter the fact that my four-legged thespian loves to put on an act and delight whatever might constitute an audience in the small barn where he lives.

Yukking it up and flashing those pearly whites for the camera is one of his many pleasures.

This week the topic of conversation around the barn has been the mucky-ness of the paddocks.

While these green spaces recover from the ravages of winter, the horses are on hourly rotation out in the sand ring which is itself a mire of mud and murkiness. This schedule will continue until the paddocks are demonstrating more resilience and the grass has had a chance to grow.

Like all the other horses, Bear cannot resist the urge to drop to his knees and roll … and roll … and roll. The current soft squooshiness of the sand ring makes this a particularly appealing pastime.

Yesterday Bear’s blanket, as evidenced by this image taken in said paddock with his buddy, Sam, was absolutely filthy. He has the role of mudslinger down pat.

Sam and Ham

Later, as I was photo-documenting the results of his shenanigans in the barn he decided to be the centre of attention for his own reasons, and proceeded to ham it up for the camera.

Yuk it up 2

Naturally, the bucket of carrots at his feet had something to do with it. Like all great entertainers he expects to be rewarded for his efforts.

Aries is looking for a best supporting actor nod as he rests his chin on Bear’s rump trying to get in on the action.

Aries wants a carrot

You can see how well that’s going over.

*

This is my escape from the world and its drama.

After a couple of hours with Bear my perspective on a broader world beyond my control changes as I realize the amazing influence I can have on my horse and he on me.

My heart goes out to all whose lives have been radically changed this week by terrible events … and not just the ones we know about.

Nurture what you love … and create a happier world for yourself and those within your influence … while the chance is yours.

Be well …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

*

Copyright Aimwell CreativeWorks 2013

Wandering through Alfalfa

This week I feel like I’m wondering through alfalfa … all kinds of delicious opportunity around me yet unable to take advantage of it because I haven’t been feeling so great.

On Tuesday, after only 20 minutes or so in the saddle, I nearly collapsed from heat exhaustion and had to bring our training session to an abrupt halt. Bear seemed to know something was up. As I sat on a jump regaining my breath and equilibrium he nuzzled me behind the ear as if to assure me everything would be alright. Horses are so intuitive.

Well yesterday, after riding just long enough to find my legs again and feel good about it, I had my friend, Christine, work Bear in the canter. She rides him very well and it is a joy to be able to watch my beautiful horse go through his paces. To see how far he (we) have come in the past year does my heart good. It’s been challenging, and enjoyable, to say the least.

I want to continue growing with Bear, and to do so I must take care of myself. Recovery from adrenal fatigue is a long process, but I am determined in my quest for total health.

So, back to yesterday …

Since I had my camera in the car I grabbed it and captured an abundance of moments, including this one in which Bear, with Christine aboard but not pictured, is wondering through the alfalfa recovering after his vigorous workout. As horses do, he helped himself to a tasty morsel from time to time and relished every one.

I relish every moment with my Bear. Whether I’m with him on the ground or in the saddle he is an important part of my healing journey. I am blessed.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy 🙂

Copyright Aimwell CreativeWorks 2012

Bear Therapy …

This week has been about Bear therapy …

There is nothing, perhaps, more mellowing than a mellow horse, and I have needed the comfort of my mellow horse these past few days.

If you follow my blog “Eyes to Heart” you’ll know that my family suffered a traumatic event late Wednesday night. I haven’t been specific about it … not yet. Suffice to say when the life of one of your loved ones is suddenly and unexpectedly threatened it is a shock. I have spent the last couple of days feeling unbalanced and emotionally vulnerable. It has required all my effort to stay grounded and in the moment. The first 12 hours were especially rough.

Since I’m still healing from adrenal fatigue too I’ve had to be especially mindful of my response to this situation and create a lot of down time for myself to recover. This has meant none of my regular physical exertion, i.e. no riding.

It’s disappointing to say the least, but sad eyes and heavy heart are not conducive to the focus and fortitude required to direct a 1,200 lb equine around a riding arena.

So instead I’ve been spending extra time with Bear in the barn … grooming mostly … lingering over his daily “spa” treatments as I release the unpleasant stress of the past 48 hours.

Of course, he doesn’t mind this at all as he happily inhales the carrots and apples and stud muffins, (oh my!) I faithfully deliver. Apart from the occasional pawing hoof if I’m not keeping up to his imagined dietary demands and schedule, he stands quietly in the cross ties while I fuss over him. His lavender aromatherapy facial massage is as much for me in the giving as it is for him in the receiving. I breathe in its pungent fragrance, and my heart softens … and Bear gives me his toothy grin which, of course, makes me smile.

And it’s a pretty darn good escape from the turmoil, leaving me free to mull, contemplate and meditate and let go of what I am powerless to change. I am reminded to be in the moment and the presence of Bear.

I fly to Calgary today to offer my loved one support for a few days. He’s out of ICU and feeling better, though bewildered. I don’t know what I can do but hold his hand and tell him I love him.

Before I leave I’m heading to the barn for more Bear therapy. There can never be too much of that …

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

Copyright Aimwell Enterprises 2012

Nurturing Thoughts on Mother’s Day

I take my role as horse mom pretty seriously.

In my view, I have been given stewardship over one of God’s creatures. I do not own Bear. (If anything, he owns me …;-) )  I have taken on the responsibility of seeing to the welfare and well being of this beautiful horse and so I nurture him to the best of my ability. I want him to be happy, healthy and enjoy a satisfying life experience.

Due to circumstances beyond my control I do not have children of my own. I don’t dwell on it. It is what it is. So I turn my nurturing instincts instead to my four-legged, fuzzy children, all of whom teach me valuable lessons as I wear the mantle of nurturer.

Experience has shown me that how we nurture someone or something will either bless us, or come back to haunt us. It’s one of the reasons, I suspect, it’s so important to be mindful of our decisions and interactions with others.

It also pays, I’ve found, to be discerning with respect to the kinds of influences we invite into our lives. What we take in we inevitably dish out, whether we intend to, or not. Remember the saying “Garbage in; garbage out?”

So … I have this horse, and …

… as I nurture him past his spooks and moments of discomfort I, in turn, learn to negotiate the spooks and discomfort in my own life more effectively

… as I nurture him to a more athletic way of being under saddle I, in turn, am more athletic in the saddle

… as I nurture his mind, body and spirit with daily rituals of grooming, exercise and feeding I, in turn, am more mindful of my own self-care

… as I nurture his playful spirit I, in turn, am more playful

… as I nurture his happy nature my nature, in turn, assumes one of happiness.

It’s really very simple.

The obvious reward for being a diligent and loving, caring nurturer is the pure joy of seeing whatever we’ve nurtured, thrive. In my case, it’s Bear. The fact that I, too, can thrive from this experience is a happy, and most welcome, side effect.

Happy Mother’s (Nurturer’s) Day!

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

Please participate in the poll in my post Poll: You and Horses

Copyright Aimwell Enterprises 2012