A New Year

Comet 1200 WM

Happy New Year!

We’re in for big changes here at the farm. New experiences; new opportunities.

Exciting times!

Looking forward to sharing them with you.

Wishing you much beauty and bounty as 2020 unfolds.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2020

 

 

 

Yonder

Yonder

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Finally, some nice spring weather and a chance to be creative with the horses again.

I call this image Yonder. It has two points of focus … the horse’s eye in the foreground and then something less defined on the horizon.

Life is kind of like this. Of course, it’s important to be aware of what’s right in front of us, still it’s equally important to be open to the unexpected possibilities that await on that fuzzy horizon. We just never know what little slice of wonder is coming our way.

Be well … and be open ❤️

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019
Aimwell CreativeWorks

 

Celebrating Unsung Heroines of the Horse Industry for International Women’s Day

Many incredible horse women have made a difference to my life. Either through their skills, talents, or examples, they’ve shown me how to be, and not to be, around these magnificent creatures.

Unsung Heroines Poster

The equestrian world is its own school for life, speaking to those with hearts open enough to listen and learn.

Here’s to hardworking horse women everywhere, making a positive difference to the lives of horses, and humans, alike.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019
Aimwell CreativeWorks

A Passion for Standardbreds … Part II

Inside feed LR

Marni Reimers of Mono, Ontario, fosters, rehabilitates and retrains retired Standardbreds for their future forever homes.

Check out Unsung Heroine of the Horse Industry: Marni Reimers … Part II for the complete interview.

Again, my thanks to Red Scarf Equestrian for providing a broader platform for these interviews.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

Unsung Heroines Poster

Related: Unsung Heroines of the Horse Industry: Marni Reimers ~ Part I

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©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019 … Aimwell CreativeWorks

 

A passion for Standardbreds

pat LR

Marni with Santo Domingo, a 12-year-old retired Standardbred trotter she’s fostering and retraining as a pleasure riding horse for a future forever home.

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While I contemplate what’s involved in setting up a dedicated Unsung Heroines of the Horse Industry website this blog of horse mom musings is the temporary outlet for sharing this work. There’s still so much to learn about building an effective website. I don’t entirely understand “embedding” or the little extras like “slugs” or “excerpts.” I’m a writer and horse person, not a web expert.

Still, I better get on it.

In the meantime, please follow this link to Unsung Heroines of the Horse Industry: Marni Reimers Interview to find out about this remarkable woman’s passion for fostering, rehabilitating and retraining off-the-track Standardbreds, giving them a chance at a second career by turning them into amazing pleasure riding horses.

My thanks to Red Scarf Equestrian for providing a broader platform for this project.

Unsung Heroines Poster

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

Further reading:

Unsung Heroines of the Horse Industry: Eira Engzell Interview

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©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019 … Aimwell CreativeWorks

Let’s celebrate the barn dog …

Milo LR

Milo holds space

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A barn is incomplete without at least one barn dog.

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Barn dog Reilly LR

Reilly keeps watch

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These unsung canine heroes and heroines are tasked with all kinds of important responsibilities.

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Clean up crew LR

BoBo on clean up duty

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They’re wonderful companions and crew.

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Barn dogs LR

Abbey and Mikaila keep company

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They’re loyal to a fault.

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Bjorn LR

Bjorn accompanies Willow and Juliette to the arena

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They complete the picture.

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Reilly and Abbey LR

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019 … Aimwell CreativeWorks

No “Snow Days”

life goes on

There are no “Snow Days” on a horse farm.

No cancellations due to icy road conditions or blowing snow
(with the exception of riding because, yes, there is wind chill in the arena not fit for human or horse)

On the coldest, snowiest, blowiest, most unpleasant days:

the stalls still need to be mucked;

the horses still need to be fed;

water buckets in the paddocks still need to be dumped and replenished;

hay still needs to be distributed several times a day;

the barn still needs to be swept and cleaned;

the horses still need to be groomed ;

an ailing horse still needs attention;

the manure still needs to be dumped …

and so it goes.

Just sayin’ …

Here’s to the unsung heroines of the horse industry enduring winter conditions at equestrian facilities everywhere!

Stay warm and nurture what you love…

Dorothy
Horse Mom

 

~*~

 

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019 … Aimwell CreativeWorks

 

 

Trust Me

greetings

~*~

Horses are social creatures. Curious and affectionate, especially among those they trust.

In that way they are like people. We all want relationships where we can be ourselves and feel comfortable socially. Where we can be curious and open to new ideas that help us to expand our experience of life and grow without threat of judgment or censure. So we can thrive, and not merely survive.

Still, trust is a fragile thing and easily abused. Horses are slow to trust. We must earn it every time we interact with them. To do this we must be authentic and consistent every moment we spend with them. To this end we must release the ego and its toxic agenda and surrender to the truth that lies within the heart.

Canadian horse trainer, Chris Irwin, describes horses as “victims waiting to happen.” To me this says that when we want a connection with a horse we must demonstrate that we are worthy of their trust. For, when we engage with them with the intention of creating connection we’re actually asking them to relinquish their natural instinct as prey and trust that we are not, in fact, a predator.

In my opinion, one of the most precious and satisfying feelings is to have earned the trust and made a connection with one these 1,200 lb (+/-) flight animals. From this perspective alone it is a privilege to pat a horse never mind sit on its back.

Too few people understand this.

Nurture what you love,

Dorothy
Horse Mom

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019 … Aimwell CreativeWorks