Two Years

BFFs 1200

~ Bear and Abbey ~

It’s been two years since my beautiful horse, Bear, died so unexpectedly. Where does the time go? Memories like that depicted in this photo remind me of his gentleness. He and Abbey were such good friends. She really missed him for a while, but over time has transferred her affections to my mare, Sophia. Animals are so adaptable. We could learn a thing or two from them, I think.

 

It’s also been too long since my last post. Life unfolds, and unfolds, and unfolds and sometimes the unfolding is so involved it’s difficult for the Muse to get a word in edgewise. Still, I’m hoping things will settle down soon so I can get back to putting pen to paper, as it were.

In the meantime, I’ll leave you with this …

“Real transformation begins when you embrace your problems as agents of growth.”

Michael A. Singer
(from his book “The Untethered Soul”)

As always, nurture what you love,

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy E. Chiotti … All Rights Reserved 2019

Pony Potpourri

And now for something completely different …

~*~

“He’s of the colour of the nutmeg. And of the heat of the ginger…. he is pure air and fire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him, but only in patient stillness while his rider mounts him; he is indeed a horse, and all other jades you may call beasts.”

~William Shakespeare, Henry V

~*~

Last weekend I had the pleasure of meeting Deborah, a budding equestrian photographer.

She asked if she could take some photos of Bear and, as you can imagine, I had no problem with that … and neither did he.

Deborah sent me a sample and I’m posting them here for your viewing pleasure.

Enjoy!

~*~

Bear’s and my progress continues. A new level of self-awareness emerges. The act of processing ~ releasing the old and embracing the new, as well as creating new mental, physical and emotional muscle memory ~ can be tiring for both of us but we are growing together in a new way of being which is far more positive and forward focused than we’ve experienced.

Yesterday we went on our first hack in the snow. Yes, if you can believe it I’ve had Bear for almost eight years and finally we went for a ride (albeit a short one) out in the snow.

It’s a brave new world.

~*~

“A horse can lend its rider the speed and strength he or she lacks, but the rider who is wise remembers it is no more than a loan”.

Pam Brown

~*~

Bear and Zu Zu have separated.

Not as tragic as it sounds. Zu’s got girly things going on and Bear doesn’t need to be in the way of one of her mood swings. So, my beautiful boy is now paddock prowling with two new friends ~ Dream and Konnor. The transition has gone well. Everyone is getting along. However, I noticed yesterday that someone had taken a plum-sized chunk of hair and some flesh out of his hip with their teeth. His first battle scar.

I guess they’re still jockeying their hierarchy out there in the paddock, but my guess is he’s the low man on the totem pole. Poor Bear. I don’t really think he cares as long as he gets to eat.

~*~

Why is a horse’s frog called a frog?

A horse actually has four frogs ~ one located at the bottom of each foot on the underside. Its rubbery construct acts as a shock absorber when the horse strikes his foot to the ground. But where did the term frog come from?

Unknown

Source: Wikipedia

Some say it’s called this because of its triangular shape and how this resembles a frog. But I did a little research and found this at The Hoof Project .

“How the horse’s frog acquired its name is somewhat obscure. It seems doubtful that the term was derived from a resemblance to the back of the amphibian. Older English texts refer to the frog as the frush, which is confusing as it indicates that the word may be of German origin where the word for frog is frosch. Alternatively, earlier references indicate that the word for frog is derived from the French word forchetta and/or forchette which are best translated as a “little fork” which, in turn, is used to refer to a fork with only tines. This suggests that the two limbs, or crus, of the frog were thought to resemble the tines of a fork. Technically, the Latin cuneus ungulae describes the concept that the frog is a wedge (cuneus) in the hoof (unglue).”

~*~

“He flung himself upon his horse and rode madly off in all directions.”

Stephen Leacock

~*~

That was fun!

A bit of a horse hodgepodge, but a change is as good as a rest.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy 🙂
Horse Mom

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2014

Greetings …

Together

~*~

A stubborn horse walks behind you, an impatient horse walks in front of you, but a noble companion walks beside you.

 Author Unknown

~*~

We haven’t forgotten you.

Thanks for hanging in and sharing our journey.

We’ll be back soon.

Nurture what you love …

Dorothy
Horse Mom

~*~

©Dorothy Chiotti, Aimwell CreativeWorks 2013